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CinemaGear camera logo element 35mm Cameras

Twentieth Century-Fox Cine Simplex Camera number 109 out of the collection of John Hora

Twentieth Century-Fox Cine Simplex Camera

This Twentieth Century-Fox Cine Simplex camera, serial number 109, comes out the collection of my friend, noted cinematographer and collector John Hora. Over the course of the last six months, this camera has been carefully cleaned, repaired, and restored to working condition.

Panavision ARRI 35 II C camera

Pan ARRI 35 II C

This Pan ARRI 35 II C camera is offered as shown, with Panavision iris rods, a Panavision follow focus, and a Panavision matte box, as well as a bigger, brighter magnifying eyepiece, and an Arriflex constant speed motor. It also comes with a recreation of the original Pan-ARRI logo, as well as the wonderfully convenient and brilliantly designed Ted Rae top carry handle.

original Cinerama slate from How the West Was Won out of the collection of John Hora

Original Slate from "How The West Was Won" (1962)

Shown here is an original 3-panel slate from the epic western adventure “How the West Was Won” (1962) shot in Cinerama out of the collection of veteran cinematographer John Hora. Cinerama was a widescreen format that made use of an amazing piece of engineering that incorporated 3 separate film transports and lens assemblies to shoot 3 synchronized film panels at the same time. These were later projected simultaneously to make up the widescreen image. “How the West Was Won”, produced by MGM, was directed by John Ford, Henry Hathaway, and George Marshall (who appears on this slate) and starred James Stewart, John Wayne, Gregory Peck, Henry Fonda, and Debbie Reynolds, among many others. A very cool piece of movie history!

Wilart Professional Cinema Camera

Wilart Professional Camera

I am delighted to share with you all this fascinating, extremely rare, ca. 1921 Wilart Camera restored by my good friend Michael Madden. This camera features durable, all-metal construction, an automatic shutter, and behind-the-lens slots for split screen, spyglass, keyhole, and other effects masks. The camera also features an ingenious critical focusing tube that allows the cinematographer to view and compose through a single frame of film without fogging any of the adjacent frames. Additional features include footage and frame counters, a micrometer-based focus control that synced focus between the finder lens and the taking lens, automatic light traps on the magazine, along with a variety of other forward thinking features unique to the Wilart camera.

Vinten model H 35mm motion picture film camera

Vinten model H

This Vinten Model H camera has been meticulously cleaned, serviced, and returned to working condition. Comes complete with two 400' magazines, a motor, and three lenses (1ea. - Cooke Speed Panchro 1in [25mm] f2; 1ea. - Cooke Speed Panchro 35mm f2; 1ea. - Cooke Speed Panchro 50mm f2).

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Mitchell Standard no. 27 with MGM Bungalow Blimp

Mitchell Standard no. 27 with MGM Bungalow Blimp

Every once in a while, some of the most unique things come across my desk. A few weeks ago, a friend of mine in Australia sent me pictures of Mitchell Standard #27 which he has been lovingly restoring. If this wasn’t unique enough, he also had something I had never seen outside of publicity photos: one of the MGM “Bungalow” sound blimps. It is always exciting to see such an early Mitchell camera, this one dating to mid-1923 and originally sold to MGM. The Bungalow sound blimp was designed by MGM cinematographer John Arnold in 1929 and, we believe, built in house by the studio.

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Arriflex 35 2B 2-perf Techniscope 35mm motion picture film camera

Arriflex 35 II B Techniscope

Arriflex II B custom converted for 2-perf pull-down and PL lens mount, with one reversible 400' magazine, hand grip with remote on/off button, and an upgraded variable speed motor with controller cable (requires 24V DC). The motor features a standard 3/8-16 threaded mounting hole at the base for easy tripod mounting. The ground glass is pencil marked for the correct Techniscope format.

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Arriflex 35 2B 2-perf Techniscope 35mm motion picture film camera

Arriflex 35 II B Techniscope

Arriflex II B custom converted for 2-perf pull-down and PL lens mount, with one reversible 400' magazine, and an upgraded variable speed motor with controller cable (requires 24V DC). The motor features a standard 3/8-16 threaded mounting hole at the base for easy tripod mounting. The ground glass is pencil marked for the correct Techniscope format.

Original Arriflex 35 spinning mirror motion picture camera

Arriflex 35 #1255

Original World War II Arriflex 35 #1255. In 1937, the Arriflex 35 hand-held motion picture camera was introduced. It features a revolutionary spinning mirrored shutter and a parallax-free erect image viewfinder. This example, serial # 1255 was originally manufactured ca. 1943.

Arriflex 35 II B camera

Arriflex 35 II B

Arriflex II B 35mm Spinning Mirror Reflex camera with an Arriflex variable speed motor. This camera comes complete with one 400' reversible magazine, an Arriflex matte box, and a power cable, and a Kadisch High Hat. This camera has been recently serviced and is in very clean used condition.

Arriflex II B 35mm motion picture film camera with PL lens mount

Arriflex 35 II B with PL mt

Arriflex 35 II B spinning mirror reflex camera with PL lens mount, custom fit IIC camera door and viewfinder optics, and custom tape hook. This camera comes complete with a 400' reversible magazine, MCC Logical Designs Flat Base, and a variable speed motor.

Bell and Howell 2709 no. 586

Bell & Howell 2709 #586

Bell & Howell 2709 # 586 was originally sold to Seminole Films, Inc. of Eustis, FL on April 2, 1923. Seminole Films was established by Dr. Edgar J. Banks in 1922. Dr. Banks (1866-1945) was an archeologist turned filmmaker, often called an inspiration for the character Indiana Jones.

Bell and Howell 2709 no. 707

Bell & Howell 2709 #707

Bell & Howell 2709 # 707, was originally purchased on November 2, 1925 by First National Productions, a subsidiary of First National Pictures. First National was one of the 5 major Hollywood studios in the 1920s and was later acquired by Warner Brothers.

Bell and Howell 2709 no. 1015

Bell & Howell 2709 #1015

Bell & Howell 2709 #1015 was originally sold to the United States Department of the Interior on June 13, 1936. Sometime in its career it was converted to a rackover L base by Camera Equipment Company. Research into this camera's history is ongoing. The Bell & Howell Standard camera, model 2709, was introduced in 1912 and produced through the 1950's.

Bell and Howell Eyemo

Bell & Howell Eyemo

35mm Bell & Howell Eyemo camera with original case and accessories. The 35mm Bell & Howell Eyemo was introduced in 1925 as a successor to the popular 16mm Filmo that was launched in 1923.

Bell and Howell Spider Eyemo

Bell & Howell Spider Eyemo

35mm Bell & Howell Spider Eyemo with original case and accessories. The 35mm Bell & Howell Eyemo was introduced in 1925 as a successor to the popular 16mm Filmo that was launched in 1923.

Bell and Howell Spider Eyemo

Bell & Howell Spider Eyemo

35mm Bell & Howell Spider Eyemo with original case and accessories. The 35mm Bell & Howell Eyemo was introduced in 1925 as a successor to the popular 16mm Filmo that was launched in 1923.

$2,000
Item# C10732
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DeVry Standard Lunchbox camera

DeVry Standard "Lunch Box" Camera

The DeVry Standard Portable Camera, nicknamed the Lunch Box for its rectangular metal box design, was introduced in 1926. Advertisements touted the camera’s ease of use, durable construction, and low cost. This particular camera, serial # 765, was once owned by actress Marion Davies.

Eclair Cameflex CM3 with Eclair tripod and matte box

Eclair Cameflex CM3

The Eclair Cameflex was introduced to the US market in 1949. This Éclair Cameflex CM3 16/35mm motion picture camera features: spinning mirror reflex viewfinding, a bright orientable viewfinder, a 3 lens turret, and includes two 400' 35mm displacement magazines, and an original Eclair aluminum tripod and friction head. The 3-lens turret features one Nikon lens mount and two Eclair lens mounts. (The Nikon lens is shown for demonstration purposes and is sold separately.)

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Fries Mitchell 35R3 no. 1437

Fries Mitchell 35R #1437

This camera began its life as a Mitchell GC, serial # 1437, on September 22, 1965. It was originally sold to the Continental Electronics Manufacturing Company, a builder of high-power radio antennas. It was converted by Fries Engineering into a Fries Mitchell 35R in the 1980’s.

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Fries Mitchell 35R3 no. 1342

Fries Mitchell 35R #1342

This camera began its life as a Mitchell GC, serial # 1342, on March 11, 1960, when it was sold to Fort Huachuca in southern Arizona. It was converted by Fries Engineering into a Fries 35R in the 1980's.

Mitchell Standard no. 532

Mitchell Standard #532

Mitchell Standard #532 was originally purchased by the United States Army Signal Corps in 1943. We acquired it in 2021 from the camera inventory of John Lemmon Films, Inc., a studio based in Charlotte, North Carolina who specialized in clay animation.

Mitchell GC no. 763

Mitchell GC #763

Mitchell GC #763 was originally sold to Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico in 1948. The Mitchell GC ("Government Camera") was adapted from the original Mitchell Standard in the 1930's or 40's as a more economical version for the U.S. military.

Mitchell GC no. 779

Mitchell GC #779

Mitchell GC #779 was originally sold to the United States Navy in 1949. The Mitchell GC ("Government Camera") was adapted from the original Mitchell Standard in the 1930's or 40's as a more economical version for the U.S. military.

Mitchell GC no. 1032

Mitchell GC #1032

Mitchell GC #1032 was originally sold to the United States Army Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1953. Located just outside of Aberdeen, Maryland, the Aberdeen Proving Ground was established in 1917 as the US prepared to enter World War I. This is a Type A chronograph GC camera that records an image of a clock face (or other instrumentation) along with the main subject on each film frame. The military employed these chronograph cameras to document aircraft and weapons tests.

Card image cap

Mitchell GC #1452

Mitchell GC #1452 was originally sold to the Raytheon Manufacturing Company in 1968. Raytheon was founded in 1922 and remains a leading developer of defense electronics, including radar systems, satellite sensors, and cybersecurity. Key early Raytheon developments include the S Gas Rectifier Tube that revolutionized household radios, and the invention of the microwave oven.

Mitchell MK II no. 182

Mitchell MK II #182

The Mitchell Mark II 35mm Studio Reflex Camera was introduced in 1962 and was a major departure from the Mitchell Standard, NC, and BNC cameras that had brought Mitchell such success over the previous five decades. This camera was a lighter-weight, hand-holdable 35mm pin-registered, high speed camera with a spinning mirror reflex viewfinding system. This camera, #182, was manufactured in June 1963 and comes out of the collection of cinematographer John Hora.

Mitchell NC no. 239

Mitchell NC #239

Mitchell NC #239 was originally sold to the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 and used by the First Motion Picture Unit. The FMPU was the first military unit made up entirely of movie industry professionals. During the Second World War, the FMPU produced recruitment, training, and propaganda films for the U.S. military, and also trained combat camera units for deployment overseas.

Mitchell NCR no. 345

Mitchell NCR #345

Mitchell NCR #345 was originally sold to Associated Filmakers Inc. in 1946. Associated Filmakers Inc. was a New York-based producer of commercial, industrial, and educational films. This NCR is an early reflex conversion that utilizes the Mitchell Standard lens mount.

Mitchell NC no. 669 35mm motion picture film camera

Mitchell NC #669

Mitchell NC #669 was originally sold to the Lookout Mountain Air Force Station in California in 1959. Lookout Mountain was a fully equipped movie studio within the U.S. military whose main mission was to record bomb detonations and weapons tests.

Mitchell NC #701 35mm motion picture film camera

Mitchell NC #701

Mitchell NC #701 was originally purchased by the 1352nd Photo Squadron in 1961. The 1352nd was headquartered at the Lookout Mountain Air Force Station in California from 1947-1969, and was tasked with recording nuclear and ballistic missile tests on film.

Mitchell KF8

Mitchell KF8

The Mitchell KF8 is a 35mm aircraft reconnaissance camera built for the United States Air Force (or possibly the Navy, records are unclear) in 1958. Based on the design of the Mitchell GC, the KF8 does not include the rackover mechanism or the focus tube that are regular features of that model. It is designed to be mounted in the nosecone of a jet aircraft and the pilot could remotely control focus, F-stop, and camera on/off.

Stein 2-color camera

Stein 2-Color Camera

In the 1920's, William Fox commissioned the New York-based firm Wm. P. Stein & Co. to build cameras for a new color process called "Natural Color". The Fox Natural Color, or Nature Color, process made use of one strip of black and white film shot through a custom designed Bausch & Lomb Raytar binocular lens to which red and green filters were affixed.

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Moviecam Super America MK II

Moviecam SuperAmerica MK 2

The Moviecam SuperAmerica MK 2 is an extraordinary 35mm sound silent motion picture camera featuring Super 35 format and a PL lens mount.

Acme Model 6 Rackover camera

Acme Model 6 Rackover

The Acme Model 6 was the mainstay of the optical printing and SPFX industries, as well as animation, and matte painting composite photography for decades. This camera is unique as it features a rackover view-finding system and a 4-hole lens turret, features not common on Model 6 cameras.

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Panavision SPSR Super R200

Panavision Super R 200

A rare example of the venerable Panavision Super R 200 (SPSR), this camera is one of only a handful that have ever been available for private ownership.

CinemaGear camera logo element Large Format Cameras

Mitchell 70mm FC no. 8

Mitchell FC #8

Mitchell FC #8 was originally sold to the Fox Film Corporation in 1930. The FC ("Fox Camera") is a 70mm 4-perf pull-down camera designed for the Fox Grandeur wide film system. This camera was most likely used to film Raoul Walsh's 1930 Oregon Trail epic "The Big Trail", starring a very young John Wayne in his first leading role.

CinemaGear camera logo element 16mm Cameras

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Arriflex 16SR 16mm handheld spinning mirror reflex motion picture camera

Arriflex 16SR

This Arriflex 16 SR camera runs, holds speed, and the magazine seems to work correctly (although the outside film remaining indicator on the back of the magazine is missing its plastic cover). The footage clock on the take-up side of the magazine is in place and working. The on-board light meter seems to work, and I was able to repair the Zeiss 10-100mm zoom enough to make it a usable lens (however, this lens is missing the automatic iris control). The camera comes as you see in the photographs, with the camera body, one 400' magazine, pistol grip, and the Zeiss 10-100mm zoom lens. This Arriflex 16SR still has some flaws, but overall, it’s in really nice condition. This camera and lens are offered in as-is, unrestored condition.

Arriflex M 16mm handheld spinning mirror reflex motion picture camera

Arriflex 16M

The Arriflex 16M "Magazine" camera was introduced in 1962 as a successor to the venerable ARRI 16 ST. After a lot of cleaning, I was able to inch the ARRI M camera and magazine by hand using the motor coupling. The movement (the pull-down claw and the registration pin) and the shutter all worked smoothly. The spinning mirror shutter is clean, without any major scratches or gauges in it. The viewfinder optics are very dirty, but I managed to clean them up enough the evaluate the camera. Other than needing a deep cleaning and a general service, this camera is in pretty good condition. I found a variable speed motor in my collection of parts and was able to power the camera up. Everything ran very smoothly. The camera comes as pictured, with a 400' magazine, an Angenieux 10-150mm zoom lens, and a variable speed motor. This camera is offered in as-is, unrestored condition.

Maurer Professional 16mm Camera Model 05

Maurer Model 05

The Maurer 16mm Professional Camera, model 05, has a reputation for being extremely well made and providing outstanding registration on 16mm film. This camera is surprisingly heavy for its size and has just the coolest set of features. The anastigmatically corrected sidefinder, which slides onto a dovetail on the camera door, has a control to adjust the format in the sidefinder, and ingeniously uses a single knob to synchronously focus the sidefinder and adjust it for parallax correction. This camera has not yet been restored.

Auricon CM-72A

Auricon CM-72A

The Auricon line of 16mm cameras, audio recording devices, and accessories was launched in the 1940's with the introduction of a sound-on-film recorder. They introduced the Auricon Cine-Voice camera in the 1950's, and it gained wide popularity for news-gathering work due to its compact and portable design. This camera is offered in as-is, unrestored condition.

Auricon CM-72A

Auricon CM-72A

The Auricon line of 16mm cameras, audio recording devices, and accessories was launched in the 1940's with the introduction of a sound-on-film recorder. They introduced the Auricon Cine-Voice camera in the 1950's, and it gained wide popularity for news-gathering work due to its compact and portable design. This camera is offered in as-is, unrestored condition.

Auricon CM-72A

Auricon CM-72A

The Auricon line of 16mm cameras, audio recording devices, and accessories was launched in the 1940's with the introduction of a sound-on-film recorder. They introduced the Auricon Cine-Voice camera in the 1950's, and it gained wide popularity for news-gathering work due to its compact and portable design. This camera is offered in as-is, unrestored condition.

Auricon CM-72A

Auricon CM-72A

The Auricon line of 16mm cameras, audio recording devices, and accessories was launched in the 1940's with the introduction of a sound-on-film recorder. They introduced the Auricon Cine-Voice camera in the 1950's, and it gained wide popularity for news-gathering work due to its compact and portable design. This camera is offered in as-is, unrestored condition.

Auricon CM-74

Auricon CM-74 "Super 1200"

In 1952, Berndt-Bach Inc. launched the Auricon CM-74 "Super 1200" 16mm sound-on-film motion picture camera. It held 1200 ft on film in a single detachable magazine for up to 33 minutes of continuous shooting. The CM-74 is self-blimped for quiet operation and comes complete with a 1200' magazine. This camera is offered in as-is, unrestored condition.

Victor Cine Camera Model 3 16mm motion picture camera

Victor Cine Camera Model 3

The Victor Cine Camera Model 3 is a 16mm spring-motor driven motion picture camera manufactured by the Victor Animatograph Corporation and introduced in 1927. Alexander Victor was a huge proponent of amateur and non-theatrical filmmaking, he even developed his own safety film standard in 1918. When Kodak introduced their 16mm safety film in 1923, Victor was finally able to see the amateur and non-theatrical educational, industrial, and religious film markets bloom. His Victor Cine Camera Model 3 was released just after Kodak launched their Cine-Kodak Model A as one of the very first 16mm cameras on the market.

Bell and Howell Filmo Model KRM 16mm motion picture camera

Bell & Howell Filmo Model KRM

The Bell & Howell Filmo Automatic Cine Camera was introduced to the market in 1923. It was the first spring motor driven 16mm camera on the market and was an immediate hit. The Filmo was produced in numerous variations from 1923 through the 1970's.

Bell and Howell Filmo Model KM 16mm motion picture camera
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Bell & Howell Filmo Model KM

The Bell & Howell Filmo Automatic Cine Camera was introduced to the market in 1923. It was the first spring motor driven 16mm camera on the market and was an immediate hit. The Filmo was produced in numerous variations through the 1970's.

Bell and Howell Filmo 16mm motion picture camera

Bell & Howell Filmo

The Bell & Howell Filmo Automatic Cine Camera was introduced to the market in 1923. It was the first spring motor driven 16mm camera on the market and was an immediate hit. The Filmo was produced in numerous variations through the 1970's.

Bell and Howell Filmo Model DA 16mm motion picture camera

Bell & Howell Filmo Model DA

The Bell & Howell Filmo Automatic Cine Camera was introduced to the market in 1923. It was the first spring motor driven 16mm camera on the market and was an immediate hit. The Filmo was produced in numerous variations through the 1970's.

Cine Kodak Model B motion picture camera

Cine Kodak Model B

The Cine-Kodak Model B was the second generation 16mm film camera from the Eastman Kodak Company, launched in 1925. It is a spring motor driven camera and was designed to be lightweight, portable, and easy to use.

Cine Kodak Model B motion picture camera

Cine Kodak Model B

The Cine-Kodak Model B was the second generation 16mm film camera from the Eastman Kodak Company, launched in 1925. It is spring motor driven and was designed to be lightweight, portable, and easy to use.

Cine Kodak Model B motion picture camera

Cine Kodak Model B

The Cine-Kodak Model B was the second generation 16mm film camera from the Eastman Kodak Company, launched in 1925. It is spring motor driven and was designed to be lightweight, portable, and easy to use.

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Cine Kodak Special 16mm motion picture camera

Cine Kodak Special

To target the expanding 16mm educational, industrial, commercial, and scientific film markets, Kodak introduced the Cine-Kodak Special camera in 1933. It uses interchangeable 100' or 200' magazines and features a two-position lens turret that uses interchangeable lenses.

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Cine Kodak Special 16mm motion picture camera

Cine Kodak Special

To target the expanding 16mm educational, industrial, commercial, and scientific film markets, Kodak introduced the Cine-Kodak Special camera in 1933. It uses interchangeable 100' or 200' magazines and has been modified to take a single C mount lens.

Cine Kodak Special II 16mm motion picture camera
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Cine Kodak Special II

Building on the success of the original Cine-Kodak Special, the Cine-Kodak Special II was introduced in 1948. It features a divergent 2-lens turret that kept the lenses from interfering with each other as they often did on the earlier model. The camera used Kodak's new Type-S lens mount, intended to be a universal lens mount for all of Kodak's cine cameras.

Cinklox Model 3-S 16mm motion picture camera

Cinklox Model 3-S

The Cinklox Model 3-S 16mm spring motor driven camera was introduced in 1947 by the Cincinnati Clock and Instrument Company. The camera is designed to take 100' daylight loads and comes with a Wollensak Cine Velostigmat 1" f2.7 coated lens. The Cinklox 3-S camera operates at "normal, fast, and slow-motion" speeds. The Cincinnati Clock and Instrument Company was incorporated in 1916 in Cincinnati, OH. Interestingly, during the 2nd World War, the company made components for gun cameras for the U.S. military. They used this experience to design and manufacture their Cinklox cameras.

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Mitchell 16 Pro no. 831

Mitchell 16 Pro #831

The Mitchell 16mm Professional Camera was introduced in 1946, and is a 16mm version of the 35mm Mitchell Standard. The 16 Pro includes the legendary Mitchell rackover viewing system, and was available with the full compliment of accessories needed for professional photography. This camera, Mitchell 16 Pro #831, was manufactured in 1964.

Mitchell R16 SS 16mm motion picture film camera with sound recording amplifier

Mitchell SS-R16

The Mitchell SS-R16 is a 16mm single system sound camera that was introduced in 1964. It was originally designed for the CBS television network for use in news-gathering work. This particular camera, serial #120, was manufactured in September 1964.

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Keystone Model A-7 16mm motion picture camera

Keystone Model A-7

The Keystone Manufacturing Company was incorporated in Boston, Massachusetts in 1919 by Edward M. Swartz, Isidore Marks, Benjamin Marks, and J.M. Weisman. They manufactured 16mm and 8mm cameras and projectors, as well as metal and wooden toys. In 1936, they launched the Keystone Model A-7, a 16mm spring-motor driven camera that operated at seven speeds including 8 fps, 16 fps, and slow motion. This unit comes complete with a Cooke Anastigmat 1" f2.7 lens.